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The Belfast Monthly Magazine 1809 & 1810

STREET DIRECTORIES TRANSCRIBED
1805 - 1806 - 1807 - 1808 - 1819 - 1843 - 1852 - 1861 - 1868 - 1877 - 1880 - 1890
1901 - 1907 - 1908 - 1910 - 1912 - 1918 - 1924 - 1932 - 1943 - 1951 - 1960
1913 Tel. directory    1824 Pigots (Belfast)  &  (Bangor)   1894 Waterford Directory    1898 Newry Directory  Bangor Spectator Directory 1970
 

 

1809 - July to December

Public Occurrences - July
IRISH

ULSTER

Antrim - Married - 

Mr. James Harvey, of Clare, near Waringstown, to Miss Agnes Leve, of Lurgan.
Mr. William Butterfield, master of the ship Lady Emily Barklie, to Miss Nicholl, of Belfast.
Mr. John Alexander, of Cloghogue, to Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. J. Bryson, of Ballynarey, near Moneymore.
E. J. Gordon Nugent, esq., of the West Meath Regt. to Letitia Amelia, second daughter of J. Espin Bally, of Ballyhealy, Co. West Meath, esq.

Died - 

Aged 13, Miss Eliza Jane Spears, daughter of Mr. P. Spears, of Carnmoney.
In Belfast, Mr. J. McKee, Confectioner.
At. Randalstown, in the 86th year of her age, Mrs. Weir, relict of the late J. Weir, of Belfast, esq.
At Carrickfergus, aged 55, Mr. Peter Savage.
Near Comber, Mr. J. McDowell, aged 31.
Mrs. White, wife of J. White, of Belfast.
On the 2d inst. Henry O'Neill, of Ballinderry, in the 79th year of his age; he was a lineal descendant of the first families of that name in Ulster, being the fifth from the great Con. O'Neill, of Clanabuoy.

Armagh - Died

Mr. R. Watson, of Richill, aged 23

Down - Married

Mr. A. Scott, Castlequarry, near Castlereagh, to Miss S. Stewart, of Dundonald.
Trevor Corry, of Newry, esq., to Anne, eldest daughter of the late Savage Hall, of Narrowwater, esq.

Died -

Aged 106, J. Bourns, of Carbolly; he retained the use of all his faculties to the last.

L. Derry - Died - 

Aged 24, Mrs. Thompson, wife of Captain A. Thompson.

LEINSTER

     We feel great pleasure in recording the following instance of liberality, which has been lately made known to us :- The Rev. Mr. H. who has been for above 20 years past, Curate of Balrothery parish, having, some time ago, received a notice of dismissal from a new Rector who intends to do his own duty, a great number of the Protestant inhabitants, unwilling to lose their beloved pastor, waited on him immediately, and offered to subscribe a larger salary for him than he had before, provided he remained and give them prayers in the town of Balbriggan; and it is more satisfactory that several Roman Catholics also (with a liberality highly honourable to themselves, as well as to the object of it) offered on the same conditions, to subscribe as largely as the former.

DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES - August

BALLYMONEY

     It is said there is living at Garery, near Ballymoney, a goose, the property of Mr. J. Camack, a respectable farmer, who avers that she is now upwards of 40 years old, and for the most part of which time produced from 40 to 50 eggs each year. She regularly hatched one, and sometimes two broods in the season, until the last two years, when owing to her great age, and the course of nature, her procreative powers must have been exhausted. However, from her external appearance, there is reason to conclude she may yet live a considerable time longer.

ARMAGH ASSIZES

     A trial came on which excited considerable interest, before the Hon. Baron McClelland, in which Alexander Bell stood indicted for assaulting James Birmingham, with an intent to murder, first in January, 1806, in the act of serving a magistrate's summons on said Bell, when he drove a bayonet across his face immediately under his nose where 5 inches broke off and remained for 6 days; and lastly, in March 1807, waylaying him at night, and striking him with a hatchet on the head and several parts of his body in a most ferocious and barbarous manner, leaving him apparently dead. It appeared in evidence that no provocation had been given, as not a single word had been uttered by Birmingham on either of those occasions; and that in the interval, Bell had several times insulted him by walking through Birmingham's fields, carrying a pistol across his arm with the apparent intention of provoking him to say something, which might serve as a pretence for more fully satiating his vengeance, proving to every unprejudiced mind that he coolly and deliberately sought his life.
     Surgeon Fleming, of Banbridge, exhibited in court, the piece of the bayonet, which he proved to have taken out of said Birmingham's face, who, during its continuance there had suffered extremely. It appeared extraordinary that such atrocious acts should have been perpetrated, and the offender suffered to remain at large for nearly 3 years in a civilised country; it was, however, proved by William Loftie, esq., of Tanderagee, that he had made repeated attempts with a military force to arrest the offender, but had not been able to succeed; he was at length taken in the fair of Banbridge, when remote from his partizans, for strange to tell, such a man, who had long been an offender, had many who endeavoured to screen him from justice; and on subsequent inquiry it does not appear that any other magistrate, though several lived contiguous made the smallest effort to have society relieved from such a burden. After the evidence was closed, the jury retired for a few minutes, and returned a verdict of Guilty. The judge then pronounced the sentence of the law, ordering him to be hanged.
     Application was then made to him to have the sentence changed to transportation, but he steadily refused, on account of the atrocity of the case, and the lawless state of that part of the country, where he thought a severe example was necessary, and ordered the execution to take place in Portadown, the nearest market town, on Monday, the 7th of August. Afterwards in an appropriate and energetic speech to the grand jury on this subject, and respecting other outrages in the vicinity, he pointed out the impropriety of conniving at any violation of the laws, urging them to exert themselves by offering rewards, etc. for the discovering the perpetrators, and recommended that they should all attend the execution.

EXTRACT OF A LETTER FROM PORTADOWN
August 7, 1809
     Our town this day exhibited a novel and truly awful spectacle, in the execution of Alexander Bell, who was tried at Armagh Assizes, and whose life was forfeited to the violated laws of his country, by repeated acts of atrocious violence on the body of James Birmingham. It might be supposed that some apprehensions were entertained of a rescue, as the high sheriff was particularly desired to attend. He was accompanied by a military escort, consisting of a large number of cavalry, infantry, and several pieces of artillery; however, Bell's adherents, if any such thing was intended, either awed by the evident determination to fully execute the laws, or, from a conviction that the unhappy sufferer merited the just punishment of his crimes, indicted no disposition towards retarding, or preventing the execution of the sentence.
     Employing such a large number of the military to enforce the civil laws, might lead us to suppose the country was reverting towards that state of anarchy, and barbarism, which characterized it more than a century ago; I fear this is in a great measure owing to the state of our Penal Code which does not sufficiently proportion the punishment to the magnitude of the offence, whereby delinquents are often suffered to escape the adequate punishment of their crime; for, to a bosom fraught with one spark of genuine philanthropy or benevolence, what can appear more dreadful that the thought of depriving a fellow creature of life; who, by the proper and timely administration of counsel or correction, might be rendered a useful member of society, but who, owing to the present defective state of our laws, is suffered to proceed from one gradation of vice to another, until he becomes lost to every virtuous principle.
     These reflections were naturally suggested by the awful event which has just taken place, not from any intention of calling in question the justice of the sentence, for if any act short of actual murder deserves the punishment of death, his certainly did, as the most cruel, and sanguinary disposition was manifested by this unhappy man, who I fear depended on the party to which he belonged, to screen him from justice; it is to be hoped that this awful example may have its due weight, and that it may be well considered that it is by obedience to the laws we manifest our loyalty, and not by the support of any party.

ANTRIM - Married -

Mr. John McGowan of Belfast, to Miss Henrietta Tuke, of Dublin.
Mr. Thomas Allen, to Miss Jane Campbell, of Rock hill, near Antrim.
Mr. J. McAlony, of Portglenone, to Miss Susanna McAlony, of Clough.
Mr. John Orr, to Miss Barklie, both of Carnmoney.
In Belfast, Capt. Furlong, of the American brig, Salem, to Miss Rutherford.
Mr. Wm. Gamble, merchant, to Miss Douglas, eldest daughter of Mr. W. Douglas, merchant.
Henry Walkington, esq., Ballinderry, to Miss Johnston, of Mollycarten.

Died -

Mr. John Elliot, of Belfast, merchant, aged 71

Donegall - Married -

John Lipsit, of Ballyshannon, esq., to Miss Balfour, of Drumcrew

Down - Married -

At Kilmore, Mr. John Rorran, to Miss Sarah Munce, both of Downpatrick

Died - Killileagh -

aged 23, Mrs. Stewart

Monaghan - Married -

Mr. Wm. Gray, to Miss R. Philips

Died - Flushing -

aged 27, Charles Henry Quin, surgeon, son to the late Rev. F. Quin, of Monaghan.

LEINSTER

Dublin - Married - 

Mr. John Bradford, to Miss O'Shaughnessey, Co. Clare.
James F. Castles, esq., to Miss Ogle, eldest daughter of the late Rev. Wm. Ogle.
Mr. Wm. Walsh, of Usher's Island, to Miss E. Richey.
Lambart Watson Hepenstall, of Sandymount, esq., to Eliza, eldest daughter of Wm. Ball, esq.
Wm. Rogers, esq., of Leeson Street, to Mrs. Daly, alias Newton.

Died - Dublin -

Mr. R. Kelly, printer.
Jos. Leathley, esq.
Mr. Robt. McCormick, gun maker, late of Belfast
Mr. John Elbing, of Henry Street
Aged 87, Simon Davenport, esq., of Upper Dorset Street.
At Greenhills, Mrs. Farrel.
At Rathmines, Mrs. Hamilton
In Holles Street, aged 85, G. G. Hoffman, esq., one of the original Directors of the Bank of Ireland.
At Cornell's Court, near Cabinteely, Mr. Staunton.

Louth - Married -

Geo. Crawley, esq., of Drogheda, to Miss Hamill.
Chichester Fortesque, of Glyde Farm, esq. to Miss Hobson, daughter of Sam. Hobson, esq., chairman of the Co. Cork

Meath - Died -

George Rochfort, eldest son and heir of Gustavus Rochfort, esq. M.P. for Co. Westmeath

Queen's Co. - Married -

At Maryborough, Mr. Edward Purdon, to Miss Simpson

Westmeath - Married -

Owen Daly, of Woodland Lodge, esq. to Anna, youngest daughter of Joseph Spunner, esq. of Bally-mac-egan, Co. Tipperary

Wexford - Married -

Thomas Harvey, of Younghall, esq. to Miss M. Gough

Wicklow - Died - 

Thomas Byrne, of Killochta, esq. His family was the most ancient and respectable in that part of the country.

MUNSTER

Waterford, July 29 -

     Friday, about three o'clock, the Waterford Assizes was interrupted by an alarm of fire. The smoke was strongly felt in the county court, and the flames at times flashed powerfully through the windows. The fire commenced at the west end of the county jail, and at the distance of ten or eleven houses from it. Its origin was entirely accidental; but we have not been able to learn the exact cause, some of the inhabitants attributing it to sparks from a pipe, and others to children carelessly amusing themselves with burning faggots. But whatever the origin may have been, the effects were rapid beyond description. All the houses in the neighbourhood of that where it first began were thatched, and the state of the weather for a considerable time past had completely prepared them for the devouring element.
     Had the wind been in a different direction, the calamity would not have been so great; but it blew strongly from the west, and in the direction of the most populous vicinity. On visiting the place after the fire had subsided, we reckoned near sixty houses, which in the short space of one hour, were totally destroyed, with the exception of the walls, and even of these many had fallen down. There was scarcely to be seen any where a single combustible left unconsumed. All the inmates belong to the industrious and indigent class of the community. Many of them were absent in pursuit of their respective occupations, and the whole of them have almost in a moment been deprived of a habitation and a home.
     All of them have been seriously injured in the little property which they possessed, and some of them have been reduced to utter ruin. As far as we have yet been able to learn, and the inquiries which we made, seem to justify us in the belief, that no other accident of the kind has happened, only one life was lost, a boy about four years old, and the son of a poor industrious widow, whose husband died some time ago, and left her to support six children, one of whom has met his death in this untimely and dreadful manner. The boy was almost burned to ashes. Another child was saved by a gentleman of this city, who rushed into the house where it lay, and rescued it at the imminent peril of his own life.

Cork - Married

Captain Roper, of the Roscommon militia, to Miss Prudence Thomson, of Kinsale

Limerick - Married - 

The Rev. George Heacocke, to Miss Gunn

Died - Fedamore

aged above 100 years, Mr. Patrick Marshall, who walked without assistance the day before his death.

CONNAUGHT

     A few days ago, a poor labouring man's wife, of the name of Sandy's, of the long walk, at the town of Roscommon, was delivered of four children, three of which are living, and likely to do well

Sligo - Married - 

Rev. C. Morrison, pastor of the Evangelical church of Sligo, to Miss Ann Auchinleck, of Belfast

DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES - September

IRISH

ULSTER

     On the afternoon of Sunday the 24th inst. at Lambeg, a stook of oats was set on fire by the lightening; it instantly blazed up, but was prevent from being consumed by some persons who were present. There was but little thunder, but a heavy shower of hail immediately succeeded.

Armagh - Married -

H. D. Brooke, esq. of Dublin, merchant, to Miss Dobbin, of Armagh

Antrim - Married -

Mr. T. Read, of this town, to Miss Walkington, of Ballinderry.
W. Arthur, esq. to Miss A. Stevenson, daughter of W. Stevenson, esq. of this town.
Rev. J. Kelso, to Miss R. Johnston, both of Maragall

Died - Coleraine -

Mr. J. Thompson, surgeon.
Near Whiteabbey, Mrs. McCrea, wife of Mr. J. A. McCrea.
At the Falls, Belfast, Miss Jane Cavert

Melancholy Event

     A few weeks ago, a young lady of high accomplishments and pleasing manners, in the town of Derry, had for a considerable time been strongly attached to a young gentleman of the same town, with whom she had been imprudent, and had become a mother. Her disgrace was concealed, only a very few confidents knowing it; she still flattered herself with becoming the young man's wife; but finding his affections about to be transferred to another, she took the desperate resolution of taking his life; which she effected by infusing poison in a bowl of milk, which he was in the habit of drinking at or before breakfast. After he has swallowed the milk, he took unwell, but did not die till some days after. 
     From some previous expressions, the young lady was suspected, and when enquired for was missing; in a few days, however, she was discovered, and being permitted to go home to dress, before being committed to gaol, she took a portion of the poison she had kept for herself, and as she was going into the prison gate, a second dose out of a small bottle; this she effected in so hasty a manner, that her guards could not prevent her. She then stubbornly refused all medical assistance, and died a few hours after, a melancholy victim of jealousy and illicit love.
     It is also rumoured, that poison was attempted to be given to the child, by the father, a few days previous to his death, and that this circumstance determined the resolution of the mother for his destruction; though, strange to relate, she is also reported to have made a similar attempt herself, after having administered the fatal dose to the young gentleman, but to have been turned from her diabolical purpose by the innocent caresses of the infant; the gentleman, it is said, was several years her junior.

PUBLIC OCCURRENCES - October

ULSTER

Antrim - Married -

Mr. S. Barber, of Belfast, merchant, to Miss Moore, of Crooked stone.
Mr. J. Cunningham, of Ballyclare, surgeon, to Jane, daughter of the late Mr. H. Houston, of Ballylagan

Died - Knockmore, Co. Antrim - 

Miss Ann Fulton, aged 18 years
On the 5th inst. aged 45, John Cranston, esq. of Belfast, a good husband, father and friend.
In Belfast, Mrs. Turnly, wife of Alex. Turnly.
In Castle Street, Belfast, Miss Brice.
At Glenarm, Mr. Andrew Dunn.
In Chichester Street, Belfast, Mrs. Calwell, aged 70; few through life were more useful, or in death more regretted.

Grand Fete at Hillsborough

     The birth-day of the Marquis of Downshire, upon the completing of his 21st year, was celebrated at Hillsborough on the 9th instant, and never have we seen a more imposing spectacle than was exhibited there on that day. Upwards of 4,5000 persons, tenantry of the Kilwarlin estate, sat down to dinner at the same instant, and were plentifully supplied with the best that the season could afford. The bells of Hillsborough church, and the band of the Westmeath militia heightened the scene; witnessed by not less that 4,500 spectators besides those who dined. Our space is too confined to give a further detail of this magnificent fete, suffice it to remark, that the regularity, the decent demeanour, of the people on this occasion, evinced the extent of the influence which a good, generous, and courteous landlord can possess over his tenantry; and let it be an answer to those who are too ready to cast an imputation of mobishness and tumult on every thing Irish.

Down - Married - 

Ross Thompson, jun. esq. of Newry, to Miss Livingston, of said place

Died - Donaghadee -

on Friday last, Mrs. Galbraith. widow of H. Galbraith, esq. late Port surveyor of Larne

L. Derry - Married -

Robert Ogilby, esq. of Dungiven, to Joice, eldest daughter of James Scott, esq. of Willsborough, in said county

LEINSTER

Dublin - Married - 

Mr. Ennis, to Miss Lawton, King's county.
Ed. Archdall, esq. third son of Colonel Archdall, of Castle Archdall, county Fermanagh, to Matilda, second daughter to W. Humphreys, esq. Gardiner's Row

Died - 

The Earl of Arran, one of the Knights of St. Patrick. He is succeeded in his title by Lord Sudley.
Mr. Arthur Martin, of Duke Street.
In Mecklinburgh Street, Joseph M. Rainsford, esq.

MUNSTER

Cork - Married - 

At Cork, B. Watkins, esq. First Lieutenant of the Druid frigate, to Miss Meade, of that city.

Died -  Cork -

James Bennett, esq. M.D.

DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES - November

IRISH

ULSTER

Married - 

Mr. S. Matthews, of Belfast, to the agreeable Miss Grace Greenan, of Hercules Street, Belfast
Mr. H. McLarinon, to Miss Mackey, both of Antrim
Mr. Thomas Black, of Colerain, merchant, to Miss Henry, of Cookstown
Mr. John Nicholson, merchant, to Miss McCone, both of Belfast
Mr. James Rankin, of Londonderry, saddler, to Miss E. Pinkerton, of St. Johnstown
David Mortimer, esq. of Lakeview, co. Cavan, to the amiable Miss O'Reilly, eldest daughter of Counsellor O'Reilly, of Eccles Street
Benj. Sergeant, esq. of Saggard Place, to Miss Lyle, of Lylemount, county Londonderry

Died - Charlestown, near Ardee -

Mr. Denis Roe; agent to the Right Hon. Lord Louth
On the 18th inst. at Woodford, near Armagh, George Robinson, esq. Barrister-at-Law
At Hillsborough, Mr. John Wright, First Lieutenant of the Lower Iveagh Yeomanry
Mrs. Elizabeth Smyth, wife of Mr. J. Smyth, of Ballyearl, county Antrim
At an advanced age, Miss Lewis, sister of James Lewis, esq. late of the Grove, near Belfast
In the Isle of Man, Skeffington Bristow, esq. eldest son of the late Rev. W. Bristow, of Belfast
At Comber, Miss Ellenor McConnell
At Hillsborough, on Friday the 3rd inst. Mr. John Wright
On the 6th inst. at Cootehill, county Cavan, Mrs. Pelan, of Thomas Street, Dublin
At Banagh, county Fermanagh, Mr. Nicholas Ginn

LEINSTER

Married - 

Edward Norris, esq. of Oberstown, county Louth, to the amiable Miss Boylan, of Legdoory, county Meath
Mr. Edward Madden, of Maynooth, saddler, to the agreeable Miss Margaret Ryan, of Thomas Street
In Kilkenny, W. Welshier, esq. of the county Tipperary, to Miss Maxwell, of that city
P. Murphy, of Abbey Street, ship broker, to Sophia, daughter of the late Dr. Thompson, of Hillsborough
Robert Beale, of Beale Grove, county Wexford, to Miss Barry, eldest daughter of the Rev. Dr. Barry, of Heathfield, in said county
James Marum, of Mount Stopford, county Kilkenny, esq. to Miss Byrne, of Glashane in said county
Mr. John Williams of Birr, King's county, to Miss Sullivan, of Drury Lane

Died -

On the 7th inst. at Renaughan, in the county Kildare Mr. John Reilly, at the advanced age of 97
In Kilkenny, Miss Lawrenson, daughter of Edward Lawrenson, esq. of Rathmoyle, Queen's county
At her house in Baggot Street, Dublin, Lady Bell, relict of the late Sir Thomas Bell
In Baggot Street, Dublin, on the 2nd of October, in the 26th year of her age, Alicia, the wife of Pat. Boylan, esq. cut off, by a long and lingering illness, from society, which she was equally fitted to adorn and delight and pleasure, she so just constituted. Pre-eminent in all the duties and feelings of Daughter, sister, wife and mother; and deriving from conscious purity and innocence not less than from nature, a cheerfulness and vivacity, which disease could not always subdue, and death alone destroy, she has left, the only consolation a loss so irreparable can admit of, to her sorrowing husband, the memory of virtues and endearments never to be effaced; to her yet unconscious orphans, an example qualified hereafter to lead them to all that is amiable and good; and, to her numerous friends, the humble, but not unfounded hope, that the sufferings of her much afflicted, though short life, borne with a meek and christian fortitude, so becoming, and so difficult in her sex, and age, have prepared and purified her for the ineffable enjoyment of another state, whose happiness suffers no interruption, and knows no end nor limits.

MUNSTER

Married -

Herbert Giliman, jun. Esq. of Old Park, co. of Cork to Miss Coghlan, of Bride Park, in said co.
In Cork, Richard Rourke, the younger, of Springvale, county of Cork, Esq. to Jane, daughter of the late Garret Nagle, of Ballynamona, in said county, Esq.
At Cork, John Oldham, esq. late of Blarney, to Miss Anne Hollis, of Fish Street
In Waterford, David Hughes, esq. to Miss Anthony, daughter of Mr. Thomas Anthony, of said city, Architect
John Webb, esq. son of the late William B. Webb, esq. of Mallow, to Miss Allen, only daughter of the late Alderman Phillip Allen, of Cork
At Cork, P. Despourrins, esq. Lieutenant in the Royal Navy, to Harriet, daughter to the late R. O'Callaghan, esq.
Wm. D. Crawley, of Mount Pelier, in the County Limerick, esq. to Miss Price, daughter of Frederick Price, of O'Brien's Bridge, esq.
Mr. Godfrey C. Hodges, to Miss Ellen Crips, daughter to the late Mr. John Crips, of Limerick

Died - Belville, County Tipperary -

the wife of George Bennet, esq.
In John's Street, Limerick, Mr. James Williams, jun.

CONNAUGHT

Married - 

By special license, at Artane Castle, Daniel McNevin, esq. of Loughrea, County Galway, to Miss Donnellan, daughter of David Nixon Donnellan, esq. late of Ravensdale, in the county Kildare deceased.
Henry Miller, of Toonagh, county Clare, esq. to Miss Bindoe, daughter of Samuel Bindoe, of Cloona, in said county, esq.

Died - Dromelehy, county Clare (Dromeleby)

Thomas O'Gorman, esq. commonly known by the name of Chevalier O'Gorman, he resided for many years in France, where he obtained by his merit from that Government, the Cross of St. Lewis and the Red Ribbon. He was particularly attentive to his relatives, who experienced every aid that his limited finances would allow; but his benevolence did not stop there, for every poor countryman who went to Paris for the benefit of that education which could not be received at home, found a cheerful resource in the bounty of Chevalier O'Gorman.
     The following verses from the Morning Chronicle of October 25th, present as exact an account of the present state of affairs, as any we could hope to give, and therefore with it we conclude the public occurrences of this month.

The pregnant breeze is passing by.
That bears expiring Europe's cry;
With ruins swoln from Danube's plain,
The deluge backward turns on Spain;
Britain to whom they look'd for aid,
By rash rapacious councils sway'd,
Sees all her ill-plann'd efforts fail,
And stands exhausted, breathless, pale; Her navy sleeps, her armies brave,
Stationed where valour cannot save,
Victims of incapacity,
By fever, or by famine, die;
Have ministers a proof in store
Of folly and of malice more?
Yes, it remains that they expose
To wond'ring and deriding foes,
A nation proud of its undoing,
And dancing on the brink of ruin;
While they, whose paracidal hand
Lit for their country's weal the brand,
Shall at the mighty blazing pile,
"Grin horribly a ghastly smile,"
And, senseless of remorse or shame,
Like Nero, fiddle o'er the flame.  H.G.

DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES - December

IRISH

ULSTER

Married - 

On the 24th ult. at Echo Lodge, Daniel McNeill, esq. eldest son of Roger M. H. McNeill, of Ballylesson, in the county Down, esq. to Jane, eldest daughter of the late Thomas Bumberry Isaac, esq. of Holywood House, in said county
John Fitzpatrick, esq. of Carlingford,  to Mary, youngest daughter of the late M. Harrold, esq. county Limerick
At Dromore, Mr. Samuel Boyd, of Lisburn, to Miss Henderson, daughter of the late Rev. W. Henderson, of Rathfryland.
Mr. James McGlure, to Miss Fowler, both of Armagh
Mr. D. Hervey, Nursery, near Comber, to Miss Margaret McCullough, Rathgill
In Belfast, Mr. William Falloon, to Miss Barklie
In Dundalk, Mr. Owen Kelly, to Miss Ivers
William B. Hamilton, esq. of Rockvale, near Dromore, to Catherine, daughter of Mr. M. Moreland, of the Lodge, Belfast

Died - Portaferry - 

Mrs. Eliza Dickson, aged 93 years

Glenarm -

a few days since, Mr. W. Crawford

Belfast - 

at his house, near Belfast, the Rev. R. Dobbs, aged 38 years

Belturbet - 

On the 85th year of her age, Mrs. M. Bennet, of Belturbet

LEINSTER

Married - 

Francis Dillon, esq. of Coolbuck, county Westmeath, to Ann, eldest daughter of the late Philip Lilly, esq. of Drumboe, county of Sligo
Mr. John Smith, of Dolphin's barn, tanner, to Miss Ann Walker, youngest daughter of Mr. Richard Walker, of Mylerstown, county Kildare
Mr. James Egan, of Trinity Place, to Mrs. Vaughan, esq. Widow of the late Arthur Vaughan, esq.

Kilkenny - Married - 

John Anderson, esq. to Miss Jane Gore, daughter to the late Captain Henry Gore, of the 24th Dragoons
On the 7th inst. Thomas MacNalty, esq. of Dominick Street, to Eleanor, youngest daughter of Mr. George Whitaker of Barrack Street
In Great George's Street, Rutland Square, Dublin, the Rev. Francis Baker, Vicar of Bulrothery, to Henrietta, eldest daughter of Henry Baker, of Malahow, county Dublin, esq.
At the house of Thomas Meade, esq. Merchant's Quay, Dublin, John Magrath, esq. of Nenagh, to the agreeable Miss Fennell, niece to Mr. Meade, and sister of Captain Fennell, of Limerick
Edward George Battersby, esq. of Bobsville, county Meath, to Elizabeth, eldest daughter of the late Rev. William Regan, of Kilvemmon, county Tipperary
In Drogheda, Mr. Daniel Barnwell Hithcock, of North Quay, to Miss Daly, of West Street
Mr. S. Salmon, eldest son of William Salmon, esq. Anglesea Street, to Miss Dunlevie, only daughter of the Rev. T. B. Dunlevie, of Cashel
Mr. Joseph Mullen, to Miss Mary Taylor, of Clarence Street, North Strand
Francis Mooney, esq. of Aungier Street, to Miss Vernon of Great Britain Street

Died - 

At her house in Granby Row, Mrs. Ann Weldon, relict of Walter Weldon, esq. of Rahin, in the Queen's county, and daughter of the late Sir. S. Cooke, Bart
At the house of Henry Deane Grady, esq. Merrion Square, Mrs. Grady, relict of Standish Grady, esq. of the county Limerick
In Bridge Street, Mr. John Langan, most sincerely and deservedly regretted by a numerous acquaintance
In North Anne Street, Mrs. Fausset
In Eccles Street, on the 22d ult. Mrs. Dickinson, wife of Mr. Joseph Dickinson
On the 7th inst. much regretted, after a tedious illness, Charlotte Jenath, daughter of Edward Clarke, esq. of Palmerstown
In Mountjoy Square, in the bloom of life, Mrs. Livesay, after a tedious illness

MUNSTER

Married - Youghal - 

Mr. Lawrence Eams, of Castlemartyr, to Miss Boles, daughter of T. Boles, esq.

Tipperary - 

John Cantrell, jun. esq. of Wellmount, county Tipperary, to Miss Leet, of Merchant's Quay
Mr. John Knash, of Knockroe, county Limerick, to the amiable Miss Elizabeth Hare, of Cross, county Tipperary
In Waterford, Jesse Hartley, esq. to Miss Penny, of Dungarvan

Died - 

At Burris in Ossory, on the 2d inst. the Rev. G. P. Piercy, aged 26 (Pierey)
At Nenagh, Mr. Timothy McNamara
Suddenly, at the house of Joseph Cox, esq. Mount Pleasant, county Clare, Miss Lucas, daughter of Charles Lucas, esq.
On George's Quay, Limerick, Mr. Edward Houlehan
On the 18th inst. after a few days illness, Conyers D. Arcy, esq. of Aughalinny, county Limerick, aged 63
At Fort Union, county Limerick, Mr. John Potter
At Clonmel, Miss Anne Dillon, daughter of Mr. Walter Dillon, merchant
At Clonmel, Sarah White, one of the Society of Friends
At the advanced age of 102 years, Mary Stapleton, of Knockrow, county Kilkenny
In Cork, Mrs. C. Flinn, relict of Mr. James Flinn, late of that city, ship broker
At Youghall, in the prime of life, after a few hours illness, the wife of Mr. Joseph Seymour
At his house in George's Street, Limerick, Stephen Long, esq.
At his residence, Wood Road, near Castle Connell, after a tedious illness, Mr. Pat. Carey

CONNAUGHT

Died - Crega - 

At Crega, county Roscommon, sincerely regretted, Mrs. McDermott, wife of C. French McDermott, esq.
At Drumsna, on the 26th ult. Patrick Walsh, esq. most sincerely and deservedly regretted

1810 - January to June

Public Occurrences - January

DUBLIN - 

     On Tuesday night, in Dublin, were apprehended by the peace officers of the head office of Police, two men, charged with swindling. It appears that they were concerned with a man named Arthur Downes, who kept a shop in Great Britain Street, with whom bills were occasionally passed for accommodation; goods were raised, purchased from shop keepers, and one of the bills passed at 61 or 91 days, for the amount; by a good look-out these people have happily been detected. A visit was paid by the peace officers of the same office, to Mr. Downes, at Great Britain Street, and in his shop was found a great appearance of goods, but when examined, all was outward show, for what appeared to be linen drapery, fustian, corduroys, etc. were literally small remnants stuffed with hay.  The shop was taken by a shop keeper in Francis Street, who set up this Downes, and drew upon him, and so back in return. The owner of the house in Great Britain Street, is a very respectable tradesman, a Mr. Murphy, who always considered it extraordinary that Downes never inhabited the kitchen which belonged to the shop, nor even communicated with the interior of the house, but kept fastened the door which opened into it. However, it is now discovered that it better enabled him and his colleagues to carry on this trade in private, in order to swindle the public with greater effect. A vast concourse of tradesmen have appeared before the sitting magistrate, Major Sirr, and much important matter has come out. Those people were connected with Roscommon, Sligo and Leitrim.

ULSTER

Married - 

Rev. Henry Hulbert Wolsley, to Alicia, daughter of Rev. Mr. Hewetson, Rockmount, county Down
Rev. George Hay, to Miss Thomson, both of Londonderry
At Newry, Mr. Nicholas Sloan, to Miss Jennings
Mr. Robert Davidson, of Killileagh, to Miss Kinning, of Tullychin
Rev. Mr. Blakely of Moneyrea, near Belfast, to Miss Lindsay of Tullyhaven, near Bannbridge
Mr. Richard Rogers of Belfast, to Miss Hamilton
Mr. Robert Boyd of Carny hill, to Miss McBride of Kylestown, Bangor
Mr. John Robinson of Ballymaglany, to Miss Margaret Cummin of Greengraves, near Newtownards
Mr. Robert Gibson of Drumalug, to Miss S. Kelly of Lisbarnet, near Comber
Mr. James Wilson to Miss Brady, both of Belfast
M. McMurray of Bleary, county Down, to Miss Emily Cook, daughter of the late Dr. Cook of Lurgan
Andrew Trew, esq. of Millpond House, to Miss Andrews of Armagh
Mr. John Service of Belfast, to Miss McClure of Heathfield
Rev. Mr. Andrew Shannon, to Miss Mary Gillespie, of Newtownlimavaddy

Died - 

Captain Hope of Londonderry
Richard Heyland, esq. of Castleroe, county Derry
Mr. Francis Taggart of Belfast
Mr. Daniel Shannon of Belfast
Mrs. Elizabeth Ekenhead of Belfast
At Belfast, Mrs. Elizabeth Skinner, widow of the late General Skinner
Mrs. Richardson, wife of Thomas Richardson, esq. of Belfast
Mrs. J. Palmer of Belfast
Mr. George Martin of Belfast
Mrs. Eleanor Hamilton, of Gola, near Monaghan
Mr. Andrew Harvey of Omagh, of a gun shot wound received while quietly passing the street, on the 12th of August last

LEINSTER

Married - 

William Scott, M.D. to Miss Catharine Griffith, second daughter of Richard Griffith, esq. of Leeson Street, Dublin
Mr. William Hancock, of Abbey Street, Dublin, to Miss Ann Wainwright, county Wicklow
Edward Ledwich, esq. York Street, Dublin, to Catharine Eleanor, daughter of the late John Hawkesworth, esq. of Mountrath, Queen's county
Mr. Thomas Kidd of Mullingar, to Miss McCormick of Ross
Rev. James Kearney, (son of the bishop of Ossory) to Miss Jane Maria Atkinson
Henry Smith, esq. of Trinity Street, to Miss Fry of Gardner's Place, Dublin
Charles Lennon, esq. of Athlone, to Miss Rose Kelly of Clooncannon, county Galway
M. G. Bathurst, esq. of Hardwicke Street, Dublin, to Miss Anne Dickey
Mr. Bernard Byrne of Jervis Street, Dublin, to Miss Catharine Rogers of Brides Alley
Edward Mayne, esq. of Merrion Square, to Elizabeth, daughter of William Henn, esq. Master in Chancery
Mr. Quigley of Nicholas Street, Dublin, to Miss Anne Kennedy of Plunkett Street
Mr. Keane of the Custom House, Dublin, to Miss Shields of Henry Street
Mr. William Brunton of Ballyboughbridge, near Dublin, to Miss Rea of same place
At Wexford, Charles Elgee, esq. to Sarah, daughter of the late Dr. Kingsbury
Mr. P. Connell, of North Frederick Street, Dublin, to Miss Hart of Dorset Street
John O'Beirne, esq. of Ann Street, Dublin, to Miss Brett of Usher's Quay
Mr. John Kempston of Nassau Street, Dublin, to Miss Eleanor Saunders of Mecklenburgh Street

Died - 

On the 16th inst. in Linen hall Street, Dublin, Benjamin Haughton, who lately resided at Belfast. Delicate sensibility and genuine modest worth peculiarly marked his character. During his short course, he discharged his social and relative duties in that amiable manner which showed the benevolence of a warm and honest heart. He lived beloved in the circle of his relations and friends, who knew his worth, and died lamented.

Andrew Higginbotham, esq. of the treasury
At Vides hill, near Bray, the lady of John Mayne, esq.
At Cullen's wood, near Ranelagh, James Hyde, esq. one of his Majesties messengers
Mr. Michael McSorley of Bridge Street, Dublin
Skeffington Thomson, esq. of Rathnally, county Meath
Mr. Michael Garrard of Stackum, county Dublin, an opulent farmer, of most respectable character
Mrs. Gatty, of William Street, Dublin
Robert Archdall, esq. of the auditor's office, suddenly when departing from a large party of friends, among whom he spent the evening.
At Camelin, county Wexford, John Drake, esq.

MUNSTER

Married - 

At Limerick, Mr. George McKern, to Miss Margaret Worrell
At Cork, Mr. George Edwards, to Miss Roe
Gerald Lloyd, esq. of the Limerick Militia, to Miss Maria Moore, of Carlton Lodge, county Longford
William Cantrell, esq. of Wellmount, to Miss Phoebe Howard
Wm. Nicholson, of Turtula, county Tipperary, to Miss Stepney of Vaucluse, near Newport
Francis Fosberry, jun. of Currabridge, county Limerick, esq. to Mrs. B. Creagh, widow of J. B. Creagh, esq. of Creagh Castle
At Cork, Henry Bennett, esq. to Miss Colburn
Rev. Mr. Adams, of Clare, to Eliza, third daughter of Robert Kelly

Died - 

John Power, esq. of Clogheen, county Waterford
John Archibold, esq. of Waterford
Mr. Benjamin Moore, Waterford
Mrs. Sinnott, wife of Mr. William Sinnott of Waterford
Mr. James Savage, late high constable of Waterford
Mrs. Bowles, wife of Mr. John Bowles, Limerick
Mrs. Fell, of Brunswick, near Clonmel, aged 93
Rev. Mr. Stack, P.P., of Letternough, Dingle
Captain Herbert at Killarney
At Ballinvonere, near Cork, Mr. James Daly, aged 101, in possession of all his faculties to his last year

CONNAUGHT

Died - 

At Kinclair, county Galway, Mrs. Smith, wife of James Smith, esq.

DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES - February

ULSTER

Married - 

Mr. John Fottrel, to Miss Fegan, both of Newry
Wm. Hanna, esq. of Acton, co. Armagh, to Miss Louisa Chanely of North Great George's Street, Dublin (Chancly)
At Belfast, Mr. Wm. Henry, to Miss Moore, of British, Killead
Mr. John Hacket, to Miss Anne Maguire, both of Enniskillen
Mr. James Dumicker of Belfast, to Miss Fanny Maccowan
Wm. Lyons, esq. of Oldpark, to Miss Anne Bristow, daughter of the late Rev. Wm. Bristow
Mr. Andrew Hamilton, of Ballywalter, to Miss McMurry, of Hill hall
Mr. John Clarke of Break, to Miss Kerberry of Portadown
Mr. Hugh McClean of Clibberstown, to Miss Mary Watson of Battletown
Mr. Henry Moore, to Miss Beatty, both of Belfast

Deaths - 

Mr. George Kearns, near Lisburn
At Omagh, Mr. Andrew Harvey
At Strabane, Mrs. M. Rutherford, relict of the late Mr. Robert Rutherford
At Banbridge, Mr. John Savage
At Belfast, Mr. Thomas Read, merchant
Miss M. Ann Ashmur, of Newry
Mrs. McMaster, relict of the late Sam. McMaster
At Roan, near Armagh, Mr. Henry
Wm. Dickson, eldest son of the Rev. Wm. Steel Dickson
Rev. John Law, dissenting minister of Banagher
In Ferry Quay Street, Derry, Miss L. Haslett
In the Diamond, Derry, Mrs. Kennedy, wife of Mr. Philip Kennedy
At Armagh, Mr. Wm. Daleell, woollen draper
Mr. Stewart Graham, of Ballynafy?
Mr. James Caldwell, of Dunfanaghy
Mr. Thomas Henry, of Ballyhossit
At Armagh, Mr. Wm. Dalzel
Mr. David Kincaid of Ballymena, aged ?1

LEINSTER

Married - 

James Merge, esq. to Miss C. Palmer, daughter of the late Rev. Arthur Palmer of Kilkenny
Alexander Thompson, esq. to Miss White, daughter of Charles White, esq. of Ballybroley, Queen's county
Mr. Murphy, of Great Britain Street, Dublin, to Miss Sarah Reed, of Granby Row
Mr. James Purcel of Dublin, Merchant, to Miss Mary Maquay, of Bannow, Wexford
Terence Curtayne, M.D. to Miss Ann Thornburgh, Crescent, near Dublin
Mr. John Flyn of Hendrick Street, to Miss Ransford, of St. Andrews Street
Stephen Carnes, esq. of Usher's Island, Dublin, to Miss Maria Wisdom, of the county Wicklow
At Black Castle, county Meath, Thos. Rathwell, esq. of Rockfield, to Letitia, only daughter of James Corry, esq. of Chantinee
At Carlow, Joseph Lightburn, esq. of Bellewstown, to Miss P. Meadows, of Newbury, in the county of Wexford
Thomas Dennis, esq. of Meadville, co. Westmeath, to Miss Saunders, daughter of Morley Saunders, esq. Saunders Grove, co. Wicklow
Mr. John Kernan, of Upper Bridge Street, Dublin, to Miss Eleanor Meighan, of Enniskillen
Mr. Wm. Williams, to Mrs. Chevalier of Capel Street, Dublin

Died - 

Patrick Kelly, esq. of North Frederick Street, Dublin
In Dame Street, Dublin, Mr. William O'Neil, watch maker
In Westmoreland Street, Mr. Richard Taylor, Woollen draper
In South Great George's Street, Mr. John Eardley
Rev. Charles Doran, P.P., of Monaster even
Benjamin Biggs, esq. of Mount Street, Dublin
Mr. Thomas McCullough, of Church Street, Dublin

MUNSTER

Married - 

John White, esq. of Carrick-on-Suir, to Mrs. Lonergan, widow of the late Bryan Lonergan, esq.

Died - 

At Waterford, Mrs. Evans, wife of Samuel Evans, esq.

CONNAUGHT

Married

At Castletucker, county Mayo, Charles Nesbit Knox, esq. of the county Sligo, to Miss Cuffe, daughter of lord Tyrawly
Captain Lambert, of the Galway Regiment, to Miss Ellen Seymour of Shannon Grove, county Galway

DOWN

Died -

At Moyallon, in the county of Down, Thomas Phelps, Sen. an eminent linen draper. He was a man of the strictest probity, joined with an openness and a pleasing freedom of manners which conciliated the esteem of his acquaintances, and in as especial manner the regards of the poorer classes of society, with whom his extensive trade brought him acquainted, particularly in those excellent schools of equality, the markets for the sale of brown linens. His liberalities to the poor were extensive, and his purse was ever open to promote plans of usefulness, to clothe the naked, and instruct the ignorant by the encouragement of schools. "Slave to no sect, he took no private road," but his religion was of that practical kind, which consisted in doing good, and regulating his heart, and having made these essentials his prime concern, he did not suffer a large arrear to accumulate to be settled on his death bed, as too many do, who trust to certain ceremonies to be then practised, and certain anxieties to be then indured to atone for the habitual neglect of duties through life. Consequently the approach of death brought no terrors, and having lived in regular preparation he was free from the fears which often torment in the last moments of a mispent existence; and to which also some well meaning people of a fearful cast sometimes five way and make their lives unhappy by an unprofitable fear of death, while others live as if they were never to die. Free from both extremes, he bore a long and painful illness with patience and resignation, and has left a lasting memorial of esteem in the memory of his friends. Without giving way to the fulsome style of panegyric too common in recording deaths, it may be allowed, to give the due meed of praise to departed worth, not to gratify the vanity of surviving relatives, but to hold up a conduct worthy of imitation to all. In recording a brief memorial of such characters, the impressive language is held out. "Go thou and live likewise" -

DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES - March

CROWN COURT

Spring assizes for the County of Antrim, at Carrickfergus

Before Hon. Justice Fox

Robbery of Rev. Mr. Thompson's House, Carnmoney

HUGH KENNEDY, BERNARD KANE, WILLIAM McCLURKIN, BRYAN HARRIGAN and JAMES BROWN, were indicted for attempting to rob the house of the Rev. Mr. Thompson, at Carnmoney.  They were also indicted for conspiring to rob said house, and for an assault on Mr. McClelland.
     The Rev. Mr. Thompson stated, that on the 26th May last, between nine and ten in the evening, he was in the kitchen bathing his feet; his servant girl had gone out, and in a few minutes after he heard a noise outside the house; his daughter opened the door but shut it immediately again, on perceiving a number of men abusing the girl, whose cries he then heard.  At his desire, his man servant went to the door, but is not certain whether he opened it; the men were rushing into the house, upon which his servant exclaimed - "what do you want?" to which they replied, "D---n to your soul, you shall soon know," and knocked him down; one of them had a large pistol, another had a bayonet, and the third a small sword.  These three attacked his man servant, and he retreated through the kitchen into the hall. Witness upon seeing the men immediately got up and seized a pitchfork, and made a push at one of the fellows;- but the candle went out, and at the moment Mr. McClelland entered the hall; and one of them levelled a blow at witness, but Mr. McC. drove his arm aside; he then presented the pistol at Mr. McC. but he struck up the muzzle with his hand, and the contents of the pistol, large slugs, went through the front of Mr. McC.'s hat, and shot off one of his fingers.  Witness was standing immediately behind Mr. McC. and if the pistol had gone off in the direction first pointed, it might have killed them both. On the discharge of the pistol, they immediately retreated. The whole transaction did not occupy above two or three minutes. The servant man was wounded on the head in several places. He could not identify any of the prisoners.
     Henry Green, a prisoner, was examined to prove that there had been a plan laid to rob Mr. Thompson's house. In March or April, witness was a prisoner in Carrickfergus jail; he there saw Hugh Kennedy, who asked him to lend him a pair of pistols, as he intended to rob the house of Mrs. Montgomery, county Down, and also the house of Mr. Thompson, where he expected to get a great deal of money. On his cross examination, he said he had been 13 months in jail; had been tow or three times in jail; had often escaped the rope, and hoped he would again; he is now in jail for breaking a shop, and believes he was found guilty, but has not yet been sentenced; was resolved to do all the good he could, and wished them all to confess; he has no hopes of getting out of prison by what he now swears. The judge in his charge to the jury, lamented that there was no proof that could attach guilt to any of the prisoners, except the evidence of Green, which went to prove the act of conspiracy to rob against Kennedy. The prisoners were all acquitted, but ordered to find bail.

STEALING A COW

     THOMAS DONAGHY was indicted for stealing a cow, the property of Jane Aiken, at Ballygruby, county Derry.
     James Kernaghan deposed, that on Tuesday the 29th August last, a cow was stolen from the farm of widow Aiken, who is his neighbour. In consequence of hearing that the cow had been stopped, he went on Sunday following to a place 30 miles distant, where he found the cow in a cow house, and from another house the prisoner Donaghy was brought out in charge of a constable. Witness asked him what brought him there, he answered, "the devil and no good."  On the road prisoner intreated witness to let him escape - said he had no accomplice.   John Nichol arrested the prisoner driving a cow; he gave prisoner in charge to a constable, and put the cow into a house. William Keown, herd to Jane Aiken, corroborated the evidence of first witness. George Hutchinson, esq. said, having got information that the prisoner has a cow suspected to have been stolen, he went and found the cow in a house, prisoner said was his property; he said his name was McCausland, and that he lived in the county Tyrone; both of these assertions were untrue, for he has lived in the county Derry many years - GUILTY

STEALING A MARE

JOHN MARTIN was indicted for stealing a mare on the 14th December, the property of Robert Shannon, at Ballykeely, co. Antrim.
     Robert Shannon deposed that on Wednesday or Thursday, 12th and 13th December, a mare was stolen from his stable; there was some snow on the ground on the morning, and he with a boy traced her to the cross road which leads to Cushendoll, where he arrived in the evening, and found his mare in Mr. Kennedy's stables; he there also saw the prisoner in custody.   Charles Magee, constable, said he was in Mrs. Kennedy's inn, about 12 o'clock, when he saw the prisoner arrive with a mare, which he ordered to get a feed of oats. Witness suspected the mare was stolen, on seeing a man of his description, riding with a good looking mare, with a fine saddle and a collar on its neck, and a halter. A man named Donaldson was at the inn, who said he knew the mare, and that she belonged to Robert Shannon - Prisoner on being questioned, prevaricated, and witness went to a magistrate, who desired him to detain the man and mare, and sent to Shannon, who came in the evening. Prisoner in his defence said, he was going for some money, and did not intend to make the mare any worse, and only took a loan, intending to pay Shannon for same - GUILTY

COINING

ALEXANDER, JOHN, MARGARET and ANNE McCOY, residing at Tamnamore, near Toome Bridge, were indicted for coining bank tokens. John, Margaret and Anne McCoy were also indicted for having in their possession a pair of dies for making counterfeit 7s. pieces.  John McReynolds, clerk of the peace, county Tyrone, stated, that he went early in the morning of the 17th February to the house of prisoners, near Toome Bridge, accompanied by Lieutenant Alexander McDonnell of the Antrim Militia, and a party of soldiers.  Lieut. M. went to search John McCoy's house, while witness went to Alexander's.          Witness at first said he came to look for a deserter; Alexander was in bed, and several others in the same room; observed peculiarities about the fire place, which he has seen in places used for coining; the fire place was built up with clay, and a place left for the admission of the bellows to blow the charcoal; he observed a drawer locked, which he desired Alexander to open, but he peremptorily refused, saying it contained free mason's certificates; but on witness's threatening to force it open, he reluctantly gave him the key; the drawer contained eighteen 2s. 6d. pieces (which he produced in court) each of them wrapped separately in a piece of paper; there was a paper in the drawer with some ribbons and letters, but he did not know what it was. He also found in the house a crucible, some metal filings, and a block used in marking the edge of the piece. He afterwards went to John McCoy's where lieutenant McDonnell delivered to him two dies for making 2s. 6d. pieces.  Lieutenant A. McDonnell deposed, that John McCoy's house which he searched is divided by a partition, and the two ends have no communication. In the one end of the house there were three women, two of whom are at the bar; the third was so ill with sore eyes that they left her behind; in the corner a cow was tied, which he loosened, and on turning up the earth, found three dies, wrapped in a piece of cloth; the women denied all knowledge of them. In the end occupied by John McCoy, he found a great quantity of blank pieces of metal, some files, and a hand vice; John said he was an engraver. A soldier gave him another die, which he said he had taken from a boy ;- he gave them all to Mr. McReynolds. William Smith private in the Antrim militia, was stationed at the outside of John McCoy's house, and saw two women, one of them Margaret McC. with a boy; on perceiving witness the boy ran away; he called to the boy to stop or he would shoot him; the boy stopt and dropt a die, which witness gave to his officer.  Matthew Brady was examined in exculpation, and sail he had known the prisoners long, and they had honest characters.  John Griffin knew John McCoy; he knows that he engraved the seals of a freemason lodge, and was reputed a very honest man in his dealings. After an excellent charge from the judge, the jury retired, and returned with a verdict of Guilty against Alex. McCoy as to the first charge; acquitting the other three.

CATHERINE GLYNN, CHARLOTTE CAMPBELL, and HUGH QUIN, were indicted for stealing two pieces of cloth from Wm. Adams, a piece of cloth from John Little, and a stone of pepper from Sam. Crawford, Portglenone. It appeared by the evidence, that when the two women, Glynn and Campbell, were apprehended, the former was observed to drop the pepper, and one of the pieces of cloth was found concealed on her back below her cloak; they had left another piece of cloth at a house, and Campbell requested that it might not be given unless both were present. Glynn was found guilty on all the three charges; Campbell was found guilty of stealing the cloth from William Adams. No evidence appearing against Quin he was acquitted.

HUGH O'HARA was indicted for the murder of John Williams, on the thirtieth Dec. last, near Ballymena
     Mary Williams, or Wales said, her husband died on new year's day last; his death was occasioned by a stab near the nose, with a small sharp instrument, which entered his brain. Dr. Patrick said, he was called to see the deceased previous to his death. He had a very small wound in the eye, occasioned by a sharp instrument, which had penetrated a thin bone behind the eye and passed into the brain. That wound certainly occasioned his death. George Wilson said, he saw Williams on the thirtieth of December last, in the house of Henry O'Hara, Ballymena, at seven o'clock evening. Hugh O'Hara, came in, and asked Williams what he had to do there - William replied - What is it your business? - Prisoner said, you shall not be here, and taking him by the arm went out of the room with him. Williams was not a minute out when he returned bleeding, it was running down his chin. Prisoner also returned - Witness said to him, I think it strange you took out that old man and treated him so badly. Prisoner replied, "if you use many words, you perhaps may get the same sauce." When Williams and prisoner went out of the room into the lobby, he heard a noise, and when Williams returned he could not speak.
     Cross examined, said prisoner had nothing in his hand when he went out - there was an iron latch on the door, and the lifter of the latch was about 2 inches long. Dr. Patrick called again, said, he examined the lifter of the latch of the door, and it did not appear to have been the instrument that caused the wound, for there was no contusion, the would was clean and straight through the eye, and appeared to have been made with a sharper weapon. Has the lifter made the wound it would have been longer. Henry O'Hara said he is a relation to the prisoner, he keeps a publick house where the prisoner and the deceased were. The door of the room opened outwards, and there was a chest stood behind it which prevented it going fully back. On the night the deceased was wounded, he examined the back of the room door, and discovered a drop of blood on the cross bar of the door, immediately below the lifter of the latch - The deceased lost a great deal of blood.
Q. Was it not possible that some person in the room might have dipped his finger in the blood, and marked the back of the door with it? - A. I cannot say.
Q. When you was examined by the coroner did you mention any thing about that drop of blood on the door? - A. No.
     The door was brought forward, and examined by the court and jury.
Rev. John Fitzsimons, parish priest, gave the prisoner a most excellent character.
The learned judge summed up the evidence in a very minute and distinct manner, after which the jury retired, and took the door which had been produced with them. They soon after returned a verdict of manslaughter - Sentenced to be burned in the hand, and imprisoned twelve months.

THOMAS COCHRANE was indicted for the murder of Joseph Cochrane, on the 2d day of November last, by wounding him with a sword.
     Thomas Stewart said, he was at Ballymoney along with prisoner and the deceased, and some others on 2d November. On their road home the prisoner was the only person on horseback. Joseph Cochrane desired him to catch the bridle of the prisoner's mare, and lead her, for that Thomas was not able to make home himself. He did so, when Thomas said he would beat any Cochrane that ever was seen, and became angry, but witness said it was all in fun. Some time after on the road, Joseph made up to Thomas and lifted a stick which made the mare rear. Prisoner then came off his mare, and went forward. Witness soon came up, and Thomas asked him to go and catch his mare, and having done so he returned to Thomas who said, I doubt I have stabbed Joseph in the thigh. Prisoner than had a stick in his hand with a spear in it. Witness then went back to the others, where he found Joseph on the ground, and carried him to his father's house. Prisoner came there also, and said where will I go for I have done a bad deed. Mr. Wm. Moore, a magistrate, said he was sent for on 3d Nov. last, at ten o'clock at night, to Joseph Cochrane, and took his examination. He said it was Thomas Cochrane who ran a spear into his left breast. Dr. Hamilton said the wound was the occasion of his death.
Verdict - Guilty of manslaughter - To be burned in the hand and imprisoned 12 months, and to give security for his good behaviour for seven years.

THOMAS McCABE and GEORGE SINGLETON were indicted for the murder of William Alderdice, at Lisburn, on 29th August last.
     Mr. Thomson, surgeon, said, he was called on the night of 29th August last, at ten o'clock, to see the deceased who had been hurt in Bow Lane. He went, and found the man was quite dead. There was a small mark on one side of his head, but so small that on probing, it did not reach to the bone; but on examination afterwards, found several bruises on the neck and shoulders, and thinks the blows he had received had occasioned his death. Isabella Irwine said she was in Bow Lane the above night with Thomas McCabe and George Singleton, and others. When they were walking home Wm. Alderdice drove against them, and McCabe, who was in liquor, took it as an insult, and struck him with a stick. Alice Topping said, she recollects the affray, in Lisburn, when some blows were given, but she was so frightened that she went off. William Bradshaw said he saw McCabe and Singleton walking on the street, when another man that was near them stopped - McCabe said, you are a blackguard or you would not stop on the road. They then got into grips, and McCabe struck him, and the man fell. One of the women said, come away or he'll raise a mob. No, says one Wallace who was there, I have given him a blow that will make him lie a while. Wallace afterwards said to McCabe, Timothy you could strike none, but I have given him a blow or two. Robert Moore said, he saw from his window some men strike the deceased, and when he fell, they kicked him. Does not know the men.
Verdict - both guilty of manslaughter - To be burned in the hand; McCabe to be imprisoned six and Singleton 3 months.

JAMES CRONE was capitally indicted for stealing three pieces of linen cloth out of the bleach yard of Messrs. John and Jacob Hancock, the property of Mr. Dominick Greg, of Lisburn, on the 29th of August last.
     William Shaw sworn - knows Mr. Dominick Greg of Lisburn, is clerk to him; identified a piece of the linen, and marked it at the time it was sent to Jacob and John Hancock's bleachgreen, with the initials D.G. is sure the cloth is Mr. Greg's property.
     Francis Neal, sworn - is employed by Messrs. Hancock as watchman; recollects the evening of the 29th August last; there was linen cloth spread on that part of the green called the moss bank field; on going his rounds, all was right at seven o'clock; about eleven o'clock the same night he missed three pieces of the linen, and immediately proceeded to where he heard a noise like a hare or rabbit passing, he went in the direction of the noise over the ditch, and observed an appearance of something white like linen; on advancing saw prisoner rolling up linen in his apron; he struck prisoner with his gun, who made much resistance, and they both fell; prisoner then surrendered and accompanied witness to the foreman's house, which was about 40 perches distant, where he was taken into custody; in 15 minutes after, witness and the foreman went to the spot where prisoner was first discovered; the linen cloth, apron, a gun, and prisoner's hat were found, which were carried to the foreman's house; witness there marked the linen particularly.
     James McKeown, sworn - is foreman bleacher to Jacob and John Hancock; knows prisoner; recollects Neal the watchman, bringing prisoner to his house; afterwards accompanied Neal, to the moss bank field; went over the ditch, and there found three pieces of linen in a blue apron; took the linen to his house; marked them (He here identified the piece produced in court). The evidence for the prosecution closed, and the court asked the prisoner if he had any witnesses to produce; but none appearing, the learned judge recapitulated the evidence, and gave the jury a most excellent charge, who, without retiring, in a few minutes gave in a verdict of - Guilty
     On the verdict of the jury being pronounced, one of the prosecutors stated that he considered it a duty which he owed to himself and the public, to prosecute this old offender; but disliking the punishment of death for such offences, he earnestly entreated that the punishment should be commuted into transportation for life. The judge appointed a distant day, 5th of May, for execution, to leave time to make application for the change, and with much humanity added a wish that the law might be changed, for a less severe, but more effectual mode of punishment.
     If the sentiment of mitigating punishments were not deeply impressed on fixed principle, the conduct of the unhappy man, in this case, might tend to unsettle it. While the judge was in an impressive and solemn manner exhorting the prisoner previous to passing sentence, and afterwards, Crone conducted himself in the most hardened and audacious manner, and occasioned general astonishment and horror in the court, by his total disregard to all propriety and decency.
     We are informed that a plan is in contemplation to submit to the owners of bleach greens in the North of Ireland, the expediency of their petitioning parliament, to change the punishment of death to transportation for life, or to imprisonment for a number of years in penitentiaries, or houses of correction - 
     Sir Samuel Romilly has already succeeded in lessening the number of crimes for which death is awarded; and he is proceeding in his humane and judicious plan. A petition from the linen trade of this country might considerably strengthen his hands. The preamble to his act of last session justly states, that the punishment of death has not been found effectual for the prevention of certain crimes, and that therefore it is expedient that it should be repealed.

ULSTER

Married - 

Mr. William Fletcher, of Newry, to Miss Eliza Fox, of Foxbrook.
Mr. Thomas How, of Belfast, to Miss Jane Gemmil.
Mr. David McCullough, of Lisbann, to Miss Ann McGraw, of Maghercouse
Captain William Cavan, of the brig York, to Miss Frazer, of Belfast
Mr. Hugh Rea, of Killeen, to Miss Moore, of Ballymisca
Mr. Thomas White, of Belfast, to Miss S. Mooney, of Londonderry
Mr. Henry Gelston, of Lisburn, to Mrs. Woods, of Belfast
Mr. Edward Hill, of Belfast, to Miss Marshall, of Ballyclare
Mr. John Stitt, of Comber, to Miss Little, of Ballycreely
Mr. William Armstrong, of Prospect Hill, to Miss Eliza Foster of Lisnagole, co. Fermanagh
S. Hamilton Rowan, esq. son of Archibald Hamilton Rowan, esq. to Miss Ellen Jackson, of Crieve, co. Monaghan
Mr. Alexander Pentland, of Banbridge, to Miss Murney
Mr. William Shannon, of Magherafelt, to Miss Mayne, of Garvagh

Died - 

Mr. Owen Fox, of Koolnagar, near Dungannon
At Ballynahinch, the Rev. William Blakely, dissenting minister.
At Ballinafoy, Mr. Robert Vance
Miss Noble, at Templeporthouse, co. Cavan
Mrs. Elizabeth Campbell, of Belfast
At Armagh, the Rev. Dr. O'Hanlon, V.G. of that diocese.
At Bringfield, near Cavan, the Rev. Joseph Story
Mrs. Stewart, wife of Mr. James Stewart, of Belfast
Mr. Robert McCalla, of New Grove, near Ballynahinch, aged 78
At Armagh, Mr. George Stephenson, Printer

DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES - April

CARRICKFERGUS ASSIZES

Wednesday, March the 21st. the court proceeded to the trial of DANIEL STEWART, DAVID MONTGOMERY, and JOHN CHAMBERS, accused of the murder of Alexander McCullough, near Toome, county Antrim, on the night of the ninth of November last.
     Peter Aiken, esq. said he is coroner, and was called on last November to hold an inquest on the body of Alexander McCullough, of Breckart, near Toome. He did so, and found the body so covered with wounds, that he could scarcely look on it being so shocking. These wounds he has no doubt occasioned the death the McCullough. John O'Neil said, he remembers the night of the ninth of November, which was that of the murder of Alexander McCullough. Three days before it took place, Montgomery, Chambers and Stewart called on him, and they then fixed the night of the robbery. They said they had been looking at the house that day, and that they could easily rob it themselves, but as that had mentioned it to him, they wished him to be there - that they would not bid him go to the inside, as the family knew him, and he should have a full share of what was got. On the third night after this, the party met at a grove in a moss near Toome, between eight and nine at night. That was the night fixed upon for the robbery. When at the moss, Montgomery proposed to go to Toome to buy spirits, and Turner gave him a note to pay for them. He went, and when he returned brought some bread. They remained in the moss for about half an hour, and then they proceeded towards McCulloch's house. When they came to the foot of his garden they perceived light in the house, by which they found the family had not gone to their bed. They stopped three quarters of an hour longer, and then went to the back of the house, and as they saw no light they believed the family had gone to bed. They then forced off one of the back windows, which was made of lead, and four of them went into the house; David Montgomery, and Andrew Turner had bayonets with them. He, the witness, remained for some short time at the back of the house, and then went to the front. He did not chuse to go in, because the family knew him, and he knew them. When he went round to a front window, he looked through, and perceived they had a light in the room, and observed Montgomery and Turner engaged with McCullough, who was on the floor in his shirt. They stabbed him once or twice with bayonets. Saw McCulloch's son making endeavours to assist his father. Old McCulloch being too powerful for Turner and Montgomery, and having forced Montgomery down on his knees, Stewart, who was in the house, came to their aid, and at last they overcame McCulloch, and tied him with a cord. When lying on the floor, Turner stabbed McCulloch two or three times, and said, you old rogue, tell where your money is. Witness became so shocked with their proceedings, that he went to the door and shook it, and cried that a guard was coming. He did this to endeavour to take them off the old man. Stewart then came to the door, and told witness that they had killed him. They had been about three hours in the house. When they left it they returned to Toome, where witness left them and went home. They went along Toome bridge. Chambers and Stewart lived at Coran, near Castledawson, and Montgomery lived near Maghera.
Cross examined - Q. You say you would not take any of the property, why would you not take it? - A. Because I was afraid it might be found about me and lead do a discovery.
Q. What then did you go there for? - A. It was to get money that I went, and I did not think that when they went to rob, they would have murdered the man, and I was so shocked at it when I went home that my conscience would give me no rest day nor night. I never thought it would have fallen out murder.
Q. Now, Sir, you knew that they had bayonets and pistols, how then do you say they did not intend to murder him? - A. I thought they only intended to fight if they were resisted.
Q. Well, Sir, did not that happen as you expected? - A. I did not expect they would have murdered him, because they took a cord with them for the purpose of tying him.
Q. How did your conscience prevent you from information concerning this which appeared so shocking? - A. It bore two ways; it was shocking for me to speak of it, and I was afraid to do so from the scandal that was attached to it.
Q. Why was you taken up? - A. I was taken up on a charge for horse stealing, and gave information of this robbery the same night to Mr. Shiells, of Castledawson
Alexander McCullough said, he is son of the deceased A. McCullough, of Breckart, and was in his father's house in the night of the 9th Nov. last. He went to bed before his father, and thinks it was not ten o'clock. His father slept in the same room, in another bed, with his younger brother, who is about 10. The other brother, about 15, slept with witness. He was soon awakened by the shouts of his brothers, and when he started up he saw his father and a man struggling, and there was another man had a light in the room. His father was in his shirt. Witness ran forward to assist his father, but a third person knocked him down, when within two yards of his father, who was on the floor. Andrew Turner had a bayonet in his hand. After witness was knocked down he crept under the bed. He then went to get out of the room, but one of them gave him a kick on his breast, and forced him into the bed, and another man stood on his breast and forced him to cover his head with the clothes. One of the men asked his father for his money, but he did not then hear his father speak, another of them said, give him two or three stabs more - Heard his father say, "I must give it up gentlemen, I can stand it no longer." There was a desk in the room, with some silver in it, and a bladder, as a purse, in which was some gold. They went backward and forward through the house. Both of his younger brothers were stabbed in different parts of the body, and the servant maid was also stabbed. His father died before the party left the house. It was a month before witness recovered. He had received twenty two wounds. There were two windows taken off from the back of the house. The gang remained about two hours in the house. Witness's father was reputed to be a rich man. The family all knew O'Neil, the preceding witness. Jane Davidson said, she was servant in the family of Alexander McCullough on the night of the 9th Nov. etc. etc.- went to bed between nine and ten o'clock, and was awakened by the cries of the children, who slept in the same room with their father, and then she went to the room where he lay, and heard strange tongues, and then she saw a man standing by the door waving his hand in a threatening attitude to compel the children to be quiet, as they were then crying - (This man she pointed out in the court to be Montgomery.) Several articles were stolen out of the house, and a quilt now produced in court she proved was the one that was on McCulloch's bed. After she saw so many men in Mr. McCulloch's room, she became afraid, and went to get out of the house; but on going to the door she found the key was gone, and therefore ran to her bed as the only place of refuge. She was at one time knocked down. Mr. John Vance, merchant, Belfast, said the quilt now in court he got about three weeks ago. He obtained it in consequence of a warrant from Mr. Shiells of Castledawson, to apprehend Chambers, whom he accordingly apprehended in one of the streets of Belfast, and in his lodgings, at the house of a cabinet maker in North Street, Belfast, which Chambers refused to point out, but which witness afterwards with some difficulty discovered, he found four quilts on the bed, and among them the one now produced, which Jane Davidson had declared had been stolen from Mr. McCulloch's house. Patrick McNicol said, he remembers on the night of the robbery he was in a public house kept by Mr. Mann, at Toome. At nine o'clock at night, Montgomery came there for a whiskey. He had a bottle with him, and asked for a quart of it, and offered a 30s. note to be changed. He then put up the note in a pocket book, saying this is bad luck for my side. Witness afterwards saw him in custody at Castledawson, before Mr. Shiells the magistrate, where he also saw the pocket book. Robert Pettigrew said, he knows Montgomery, and saw him in custody at Castledawson, when, by desire of Mr. Shiells, he went and asked Montgomery for his pocket book, which he said he had left at home, upon which witness searched him (he was then hand cuffed) and upon searching he acknowledged he had it, and gave it up. Bernard Nolan said, he knows Alex. Mann, in Toome, and was in his house on the night of McCulloch's robbery. Montgomery came in between nine and ten o'clock and asked for a quart of spirits, and offered a 30s. note, but as he could not get change, he put it up in a pocket book and went away on the road to McCulloch's. He returned again soon after and looked into the house, but again went away, and then returned again and asked for a loaf. He got a sixpenny loaf, on which he swore a great oath, and said he could get a larger one for five pence. He threw down a ten penny piece and went out, the shopman bade him stop for change. He answered, I'm not going to leave it with you, and he came in again and got it. Henry Hegan said, he lives at Toome bridge, and takes care of the gate of the bridge - recollects being raised from his bed between four and five in the morning of 10th Nov. when five men came along the bridge from the county Antrim - they all paid toll - one of them stopped at the door to get some whiskey - he had something like a knapsack on his back. It was a very dark night as ever witness saw. John Gainer said, he knows Chambers one of the prisoners, who lived near Magherafelt, and on the morning of the robbery he met Chambers on the road about sun-rise. - He had a bundle under his right arm, it was tied in some white cloth; he appeared dirty and fatigued. Chambers has not lived in that country since. Henry Shiells, esq. said he knows Stewart and Montgomery, two of the prisoners, and brought them to his jail.
By the council for the crown - Mr. Shiells, be so good as inform the court what conversation you had with any of the prisoners, and what they informed you of when on the road.
Witness - I should think it might be hard toward him to compel me to tell
Court - You are not to say what is hard or what is not. It is your duty to state in your evidence the facts you know and are called form, and the court will judge of its legality.
Witness - When bringing Stewart from county Derry, we had occasion to stop, and some conversation occurred while a sergeant of dragoons was present. Stewart was a long time before he would speak anything - I said I wished he was transported.
Counsel for prisoners - When you said to him you wished he was transported, did you say it in such a manner as to make him believe, that if he gave you information you might get him to be transported?
Witness - No, he could not think so, for I said no more than merely that I wished it were so. - Stewart then said that he was present with other three persons when the business was arranged. They drank some whiskey where they were met. He a long time refused to be concerned in it, but after he had drank the whiskey, one of these three succeeded in persuading him to promise to engage in it. In the evening of the robbery they met in a field near McCulloch's house; he said he was against the murder; the blame of which he charged against one of the party not now on his trial. He then desired him, the witness, to ask McCulloch's children, and they would tell him that he was the person who saved their father's house from being burnt, when the others wanted to do so, and witness is satisfied that it certainly was Stewart who saved the house. Alex. McCulloch was again called up, and being asked by court, said that one of the robbers insisted to burn the house and the papers, but another spoke against it, and said that the papers might be of use to the family. John Wilkinson said, he had acted as a juror on the coroner's inquest held on McCulloch's body; there were a great number of wounds in it; scarcely a part of the body that was not wounded. Some persons attempted counting them but failed, they were so numerous. The body was lying on the bed, and a cord tied round one of the legs at the ancle, and bound to the opposite knee.
EVIDENCE FOR THE PRISONERS
James Watts, a prisoner for debt, said he knows O'Neil, one of the witnesses on this trial, has heard him say in the prison, that he would give information to save himself. He said so this morning. Witness advised him not to hang any of them if he could help it, but he said he would save himself.
Q. Why did you advise him not to give evidence against them? - A. Because I thought it a pity to hang so many for one; I thought it would be enough if they were transported.
Q. This advice was no doubt given from a pure love of justice? - A. Yes; from a love of justice.
Q. So, sir, you think it consistent with a love of justice, to tamper with the witness for the crown, and endeavour to prevail on them to screen from justice those who are charged with the most attrocious offences. Go off the table, sir, and return to prison. Some persons though not under indictment are well entitled to be transported. 
     The evidence being closed, the learned judge addressed the jury. His lordship recapitulated the evidence of the witnesses, pointing out the most particular parts of it, and explaining the law in regard to burglaries, murder, etc. With great humanity, he directed the jury, to weigh fairly and impartially the evidence as it had been produced before them, totally unconnected with any popular prejudice that may have existed on the subject, and that they should even divest their minds of any aversion to the prisoners, arising from the natural horror and detestation of the crime with which they are charged; but that they should enter into an investigation of the evidence unbiased by any consideration but a regard to justice.
The jury then retired, and in a few minutes brought in a verdict finding each of the prisoners guilty, both of the murder and burglary.
After a momentary pause, his lordship, in the most solemn and impressive manner, addressed the prisoners to the following effect:
David Montgomery, John Chambers, and Daniel Stewart:- You have been tried and found guilty of the murder of Alexander McCulloch, and also for a burglary in his dwelling house. Of that burglary and of that murder you have been found guilty; a murder the most barbarous and inhuman; for, if it is possible that murder can admit of aggravation, every circumstance of this deed of horror tends to render it most attrocious. You did concert, and conspire together for the purpose of committing a robbery in dwelling of this unfortunate man, and you were armed with deadly weapons, in case you should meet with resistance. You knew that though he was old, he was strong and might make resistance, and you carried with you bayonets and pistols, and must have had in contemplation, if he made such resistance, to commit murder, rather than be prevented from accomplishing your plan of robbery. I have not in the course of my experience known a more barbarous and shocking act. You entered the dwelling house of this helpless man after he had gone to bed, and, while surrounded with his children, you attacked him with bayonets and pistols. He endeavoured to defend himself, but you over powered him. Even after this, when you had tied and disabled him from making further resistance, you continued to cut and mangle him till his body exhibited one continued wound. It is horrible to think, and strange, that human beings who could act in so dreadful a tragedy, should now clamour for mercy, who showed none to the helpless McCulloch. It manifested a spirit of barbarity and inhumanity which I did not indeed think existed in any portion of the inhabitants of this country. It is in vain for you to expect mercy; in this world you can have none. Indeed you yourselves showed no mercy - no compassion to that unfortunate man, when, in the midst of his crying, helpless family, you, before the eyes of the children, shed the blood of the father. You have been guilty of the primeval crime, and most meet the punishment that was pronounced on it - that whosoever sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed.
(Here Chambers cried bitterly, and entreated for mercy! Mercy, O my lord, have mercy, and give as long a day as possible.)
In this world the gates of mercy are shut against you, and even your entreaty for mercy to lengthen your time cannot be granted - It is impossible - The law prescribes your day of punishment. Men guilty of such a barbarous, inhuman, and shocking murder, must speedily be sent out of this world; and yet, short as your time is, it is not so short as what you allowed that unfortunate person, whom you so cruelly murdered, and to whom you showed no mercy, although now so clamorous to have mercy extended to yourselves. In the little time that remains to you, prepare to meet your god.
(Chambers cried out, O! for Jesus' sake, for Jesus' sake, mercy, mercy! do not send me into eternity - make of me any think you will, but spare my life.)
The curtain of this world has dropt on you. Endeavour to save your souls, your immortal part. As for your bodies, they are doomed to suffer the punishment of the law - a necessary sacrifice to your offended country - In the midst of this accumulated scene of horror and of blood. I feel a glimpse of consolation, that I can make a distinction of one from the others, and which I shall attend to hereafter. It is the case of Stewart, which is somewhat different in its complexion or moral guilt, though not in point of legal criminality. By the evidence of the witness O'Neill, and also that of McCulloch's son, it appeared that Stewart used his endeavours successfully, in saving the house from being burnt. The contemplation of such an event is shocking to human nature. What an awful calamity must have followed, had that dreadful idea been carried into effect, and this family of young children been consumed with the mangled body of their father. The preventing of such an enormity is certainly some alleviation of Stewart's guilt, and therefore not so much out of regard for him, as from a regard to others in society, whose safety may come into such an awful situation, I am glad that I am enabled to distinguish his case. But as for you, Montgomery and Chambers, there is nothing in the case of either of you to brighten the deepest shade of guilt. The only mercy that I can show you, is to tell you there is no hope for you. To request of you not to entertain the slightest expectation fit. To impress upon your minds that you must positively and certainly die in pursuance of the awful sentence of the law, which is now my duty to pronounce.
His lordship then appointed them to be hanged on Friday, and their bodies to be afterwards publicly dissected.
During the whole course of the trial Stewart was silent and thoughtful - Chambers manifested less anxiety, and seemed rather indifferent - Montgomery exhibited a disgusting insensibility, which indicated great depravity of heart. After the verdict, while the judge was addressing them, Stewart appeared greatly impressed, but remained Silent - Chambers was agitated, and continued wringing his hands and imploring for mercy. Montgomery remained unmoved, as if determined to be obdurate; but when his lordship pronounced the sentence of death, which he delivered in the most impressive manner, Montgomery then appeared to feel, his countenance changed, and he stepped two paces back into the dock. He again seemed to summon up his fortitude, and returning to the front, addressed his lordship, requested he might be shot, and repeatedly offered to serve in any part of the world, and to take his brother along with him; a proposition which showed how imperfectly he had contemplated the atrocity of his crime. The prisoners were immediately taken back to jail.
     Daniel Stewart was respited, but has been since executed.
     The Lord Lieutenant, on the application of the prosecutor, and on reference to the report of the judge, has respited the execution of the sentence of death against James Crone, convicted at last assizes at Carrickfergus, for robbing a bleach green, on condition of his being transported for life.

DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES - May

ULSTER

Married - 

At Coleraine, Robert Kyle, esq. of Laurel hill, to Miss Murray of Cookstown
Mr. Wm. Waugh of Londonderry, to Miss Cochrane of Artcliffe, near Coleraine
Mr. Michael Mooney, to Miss Bullen, both of Belfast
Mr. Peter McCormick, to Miss Stitt, both of Belfast
Mr. John Marshall, of Milltown, to Miss Crocket, of Newtowncunningham
Mr. Benjamin Storey, to Miss E. Reilly, both of Newry
Mr. Anthony Davison, of Killileagh, to Miss E. Russel, of Ballymaconnell
Surgeon Johnston, of the navy, to Miss Armstrong, of Brookborough
Mr. Phillip Watson, captain of the ship Perseverance, to Miss Brown of Kinsale
Mr. John Munn, to Miss Haslett, both of Derry

Died - 

At Belfast, Mr. John Smylie
At Dundonald, the Rev. Jacob Haslett
Near Coagh, Mrs. Boyle
Mrs. Morrell, of Ballyquin, co. Derry
At Antrim, Mr. Alexander Kirkpatrick
Mrs. Cochrane, of Coleraine
At Carnmoney, Mrs. Jane Staunton
At Lifford, Mr. David Pyke, and Mr. John Evans, aged 90
Rev. E. Storey, of Bokead, co. Cavan
Mr. Samuel Robinson, of Waring Street, Belfast
Mrs. Cunningham, wife of Mr. S. Cunningham, Crookedstone
At Portadown, Rev. George Blacker, Vicar of Sego, co. Armagh
In Ballycastle, Miss Macnaghten
Rev. Walter Galbraith, dissenting minister at Londonderry
Near Randalstown, Miss Eliza Agnew

DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES - June

IRISH

ULSTER

Marriages - 

Mr. J. McGrath to Miss McDowel, both of Lisburn
Mr. F. Brande, commander of the brig Neptune of New York, to Miss Blackwood of Belfast.
Hill S. Scott, esq. of Dromore, to Miss E. Magennis, daughter of the late D. Magennis, esq. of Annesvale
Mr. W. Gamble, to Miss Reid of Belfast
Mr. Dailey of Armagh, to Miss Blair of Ballycastle
The Rev. James Strange Rutson, son of the Bishop of Clonfert, to Miss Hessy Sinclaire, daughter of the late W. Sinclaire, esq.
Mr. J. Thompson of Londonderry, to Miss Kinkead

Deaths -

Mr. J. Maine, of Belfast
Mrs. J. Morris, wife of W. Morris, esq. of the Derry militia
Mr. J. Cochran of Armagh
Miss E. Campbell of Armagh
Mr. W. Dinsmore of Morrow, county Donegall
At Magherafelt, Mrs. E. Ashe, aged 75, widow of the late Rev. T. Ashe
Mr. Herman Verdenhalm of Londonderry

At Kilmore, on Friday the 15th instant in the 26th year of his age, Richard Kennedy, M.D., son of the Rev. Thomas Kennedy of that place. Amidst the numbers who attended the funeral, there were few who seemed not more that usually affected. This solemn this awful procession which speaks to man, telling him in the most impressive language, the vanity of all human pursuits, custom has made a ceremony almost unconnected with one melancholy thought, in the minds of the heedless multitude; they laugh, they talk, and convey with a slow pace, the only semblance of grief, to the silent tomb the remains of those whose hands were never extended to distress, but to mitigate the pangs of the sufferer, whose eloquence was never exerted but in behalf of injured virtue, or to confer benefits on their fellow citizens, and whose rectitude of principle made the vicious ashamed in their presence, and respect virtue though they would not imitate their acts.
At the funeral of Mr. Richard Kennedy, people seemed to feel that awful sensation, which often strikes the most thoughtless, when they behold a young person conveyed to the dark and silent tomb. Cut off in early youth, while pleasure dances before, and the virtues alone appear, hope paints the picture of future days, in the most fascinating colours, but death with an indiscriminating hand sweeps over the canvas, and leaves a space for other painters and for another subject.
In order to prepare himself for the profession of physic, he studied with ardour in Dublin, Edinburgh and London, the usual departments of science, and in the Academic halls imbibed that taste for knowledge which led him over the mountain wilds of Scotland, Wales, and Ireland
His knowledge of chemistry, mineralogy, and botany was extensive, and had the shaft of death spared him a few years, his country, and his friends might have been pleased with hearing of his extending fame, for truly may it be said that in him science has lost a sincere votary, and one well calculated to illustrate the natural history of Ireland, a country so long  neglected, and so peculiarly interesting to all who study the productions of nature.
As a son, he displayed that attachment to his parents which impressed upon the mind of the observer, the idea of a peculiar amiability of disposition, a reverence for their opinions, was his constant guide.
Such was this young man, whom the hand of death has snatched from us, and were the feelings of a friend to whom the veil of modesty was lifted, allowed to float on the full tide of panegyric, much more might be said in praise of this virtuous and enlightened character.
"Deep is the sleep of the dead; low their pillows of dust.
No more shall he hear thy voice; no more awake at thy call.
When shall it be morn in the grave, to bid the slumberer awake."

LEINSTER

Marriages -

T. Armstrong, esq. of Altavilla, Queen's county, to Miss Cornelius, daughter of ? Cornelius, esq.
Mr. E. Smith, to Miss E. Tracy, both of Dublin
Thomas Taylor, esq. of Dublin Castle, to Miss Rebecca Rogers, daughter of the Rev. William Rogers, late of St. Paul's, Dublin
Z. D. Williams, esq. to Miss Mary Gibton, of Stafford Street, Dublin (Gibson)
Mr. James Costigan, of South Great George's Street, Dublin, to Miss Smyth of North King Street
At Gallen, King's co. John Matthews Jessop, esq. to Miss Horn, of Gallen

Deaths - 

Rev. Richard Joice, of St. Patrick's chapel house, Dublin
Miss Eliza Hodgson of Buckingham Street
Mrs. Willis, of Trinity Street, aged 63
Mrs. Hay, wife of David Hay, esq. deputy barrack master, Dublin
At North Cumberland Street, Mrs. Anne Ford, widow of Roger Ford, esq.
At Kilkenny, Mrs. Barton, widow of the late Jean Barton, esq.
Mrs. Mecum, aged 88, mother to Mrs. Lord, Capel Street
At Leeson Street, Joseph Cooke, esq.

MUNSTER

Marriages - 

Jacob Mark, esq. of Cork, to Miss Eliza Godfrey, daughter of Sir William Godfrey, of Bushfield, county Kerry
James Fitzgerald Massey, esq. jun. to Miss Dunscombe, of Limerick